Category Archives: antique machines

Bonnie in Ketchickan

Hello all, Mary Ellen here.

Spent some time at the BNHV yesterday getting folders stuffed for our seminar attendees. I spoke on the phone with Bonnie Hunter while I was there. We thought we had a book order missing, but it was found after we heard from Bonnie who had signed for it. It had gotten tucked away into an unused office for safe keeping.

Bonnie’s in Alaska right now, doing her schtick for the guild in Ketchikan. As she always does, pictures are posted on her daily blog. (Make sure you do your hair and put on lipstick if you’re coming to our seminar. You may get a moment of fame on her blog if you’re in a class of hers) Yesterday Bonnie explored the town and spent time in a brand new library. Check out the cool art work in the library and be sure to go all the way to the end to see the tree in the children’s section. I wonder if we could do something like that as a community service to some institution. Looks like it would be very fun for the makers and the kids as well. Click here.

Bonnie will be flying directly from Ketchikan to us on a red-eye next Tuesday. She’s arriving here early in the day so she can sleep and try to get her internal clock back to our time zone before her class and lecture on Wednesday. Natalie has lent us one of her Featherweights so Bonnie can sew in her hotel room while she’s here. Apparently she has a deadline for a new book project coming up!

Heading out shopping so TTFN!

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Filed under antique machines, guild activities, Heritage Village, seminar, Uncategorized, what is art?

the old ways…

Hello all, Mary Ellen here.

Visited Bonnie Hunter’s site this morning. Found this link to a clip about making scissors by hand. Would love a pair of these! Click here. Bonnie is just home from a recent quilters’ trip to Great Britain. That girl sure gets around–she’s home right now, but before she comes to us in mid September, she’ll be spending time in Alaska teaching.

Weaving modern cloth on old looms (found in side bar at link above): click here

Here’s a bit of trivia for you. The roots of modern-day computers are linked to weaving. Joseph Jacquard came up with a system of punched cards for weaving patterns which eventually inspired the binary code of ones and zeros representing the punched or unpunched holes in the cards. Those ones and zeros were linked to electronic circuitry being on (the one) or off (the zero). And the rest is history. Binary code became the foundation for most of the systems of coding used in computer programming today.  (Very oversimplified history for you, but those of you with math phobia can perhaps still appreciate the connections!) Read more about it here: click here.

I have a lot of burlap scraps remaining from the flowers I made for my wreath class at seminar. I’m going to make it up into little treat/gift bags. I’ve done this many times, with all sorts of fabrics, so I don’t really need a pattern. But…this pattern is a cute and very easy one. (click here) Let’s call it another installment in the Christmas in July pattern sharing, shall we?

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What to write about today?

Hello all, Mary Ellen here.

How do I find something to write about nearly everyday? Strange how the mind works. Usually I’m just commenting on something I got in my e-mail or that has recently happened in “life”. For example…

In today’s e-mail I got my blurb from “The Quilt Show”, the Alex Anderson and Ricky Tims adventure. When they first put the show up to the web, I paid for a subscription so I could watch the videos like I used to enjoy Alex’s Simply Quilts show on HGTV. Now though I just do the free stuff, since there are so many free videos available all over the web. Today in the e-mail there is a slideshow of free patterns from Bonnie Hunter. In it you’ll see 2 of the blocks Bonnie will be teaching at the fall seminar for us: Boxy Stars and Pineapple Blossom. Also shown is the block I demoed at our recent quilt show: easy delectable mountains. Bonnie calls it scrappy Mountain Majesty. click here for the slideshow

Last night we had the Jim(?) and Wally show at guild meeting–two machine mechanics from a local quilt store talking about machine maintenance. I was amazed at how many of our members own featherweights! When Jim called  ladies up to show how to free motion quilt on a featherweight, nearly the entire audience went up! They took questions from the audience on a variety of machine care concerns. One member asked about having magnets near our machines. Both fellows said to keep the magnets away! Interesting because I had just read information to the contrary in the past day or two. This exact question came up on the message board at The Quilting Board.com and all of those who had chimed in said magnets today are not a problem. This is the link that one of the responders included to support her claim. click here for the opposing view  Just goes to show that even the “experts” don’t always agree. I keep the magnets in my sewing room (pin dishes mostly) away from the machine. Better safe than sorry I’m thinking. Another question of note: how often to change the needle? The answer boiled down to: more often than most of us do. You can usually hear it when the needle needs changing. Popping sounds as it pierces the fabric. Or you can see it when it needs to be changed. Poor stitch formation or skipped stitches.

Well the question for today–sewing or gardening? Gardening in light rain is not a bad thing. The transplants love it–no need for me to water them. The weeds come right out without a fight. Anybody else find that all of your garden edging heaved up this past winter and had to be completely redone this spring? I’m about 3/4 of the way around the yard and I must say the edges are looking better. I’m thinking though that it’s time to find a permanent sort of edging–river rocks or something. Of course if it rains as hard today as it has the past few days, the sewing machine will win. Actually I’m working on a second wreath sample for my seminar class, and it requires more hot glue than stitches. Tangled with some hot glue yesterday and have a blister to prove it. Maybe I’ll find some stitching to do instead. There’s always another project in the queue.

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Filed under antique machines, free motion quilting, free patterns, gardening, scrap quilting, Uncategorized

Bonnie Hunter update

Hello all, Mary Ellen here.

I think we have made a very good choice for this fall’s seminar teacher. I have probably received 25 or so inquiries from non-members who are interested in taking a class from Bonnie this fall. They are finding the contact information in Bonnie’s calendar at quiltville.com. A couple of them are planning road trips with friends from distances away (Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Canada). I hope you’ll be joining us too.

Bonnie just finished up a teaching segment in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee at A Mountain Quiltfest. Here’s a link to a slide show she posted from her Boxy Stars class. (click here) The students look like they are having fun, and their blocks are great looking. Bonnie will be teaching the Boxy Stars class for us on Wednesday of seminar.

Marija has just finished up rounding up our cadre of local teachers for the fall, and I am finalizing the typing of the brochure to get it to the printer. We will have the brochures at the table in the member area during our upcoming quilt show. Those members who do not attend the quilt show will receive their brochure in the mail shortly thereafter. Members will have a head start on registration; we’ll open it up to non-members in early May.

Please join us at the quilt show, and surely you’ll find something you like for fall seminar!

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Filed under antique machines, eye candy, quilt shows, scrap quilting, seminar, Uncategorized

the most beautiful sewing machine in the world

Hello all, Mary Ellen here.

That’s the opinion of the man filming this video. ( most beautiful video) I ran across him totally by accident at YouTube and have watched just a couple of his videos. Love his Sussex accent. If you enjoy this video, look over his list and I’m sure you’ll find some others of interest, particularly if you enjoy old/antique machines.  If you have the time have a look at the one featuring the toy machines.

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